Modems

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Modems

Postby mwarwick » Sat Dec 05, 2009 9:01

After installing Sabayon, The selection of dial up modem was not found from the built in list. Is there a workaround? Here is the description of my system's modem. Conexant HDA D110 MDC v.92 Modem. Any help here appreciated. Thank you.
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Re: Modems

Postby albfneto » Sun Dec 06, 2009 14:16

i have in mind that modens for dial up connexions under linux, frequently is difficult...
i suggest you to search in the net, in google, in bing, for a specific driver for your model of mode,specific driver...
ALBERTO FEDERMAN NETO
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Re: Modems

Postby Fitzcarraldo » Mon Dec 21, 2009 13:03

mwarwick, is that an internal 'softmodem' (a.k.a. 'Winmodem')?

Softmodem support in Linux is not as good as in Windows. The main Linux softmodem driver is the open-source slmodem driver, but it is not as good as the drivers produced by the manufacturers for Windows (I discovered that it does not support all the Hayes commands that the Windows drivers for softmodems support, for example). I battled with slmodem for my laptop's built-in Agere softmodem, and got it to work but it was not good enough for faxing and for communications with certain other modems. You can read about my investigations with slmodem for my model of modem in the Gentoo Forums thread Modem AT commands with "\", "%" and "&" don't work [Solved]. I found that slmodem is not very good, and I still boot into Windows when I need to send or receive a fax. I also experimented with TTY communication between my softmodem under Linux and a remote softmodem under Windows, and it just would not work properly whereas the same softmodem under Windows works perfectly. The fundamental problem is that most manufacturers simply don't bother to produce drivers for Linux.

The Linmodems Web site has a script called scanModem that you can download and run. It scans your hardware, and the text files it produces tell you which driver is required (that is if one is available in Linux and assuming you have a softmodem in your PC). The Linmodems support page is http://linmodems.technion.ac.il/ and Item 8 on that page is a link to instructions on how to download, install and run the scanModem script. Reading through the various text files it produces should give you a better understanding of whether your hardware is supported by the slmodem driver or one of the other softmodem drivers they discuss.

External modems are a different matter, as the intelligence is built into the modem, and the modem's firmware will have comprehensive support for all the required Hayes protocol commands etc. In that case the TTY comms program (PuTTY, Mincom or whatever) or fax program (eFax, HylaFax or whatever) you use just talks to the modem over a serial or USB cable, rather than talking to a softmodem driver such as slmodem. I found eFax easy to use, but it was hampered by the limitations of slmodem. Had I used it with an external modem I'm sure it would have worked very well. I threw out my last external modem, a pocket Pace Microlin fx, a few years ago, but now wish I hadn't.
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Re: Modems

Postby Fitzcarraldo » Wed Dec 23, 2009 1:03

Today I was leafing through some old issues of Linux Format magazine and came upon a review in Issue 113 (Christmas 2008) of a US Robotics USB pocket modem, which is billed as working with Linux: 56K USB Faxmodem.

Image

According to Linux Format, this modem is 'plug and play' (*) and works well with KPPP for dial-up connections to the Internet. But if you want a modem for faxing or TTY comms then this would also do the job. As it is an external modem from one of the modem manufacturers, the intelligence is built into the modem, there should be none of the problems associated with using built-in softmodems/Winmodems in Linux.

* The only caveat they mentioned was that the modem device needs to be specified in KPPP as /dev/ttyACM0 rather than /dev/modem. (If /dev/ttyACM0 does not exist then you can create it: LinuxQuestions.org - /dev/ttyACM0.)


EDIT: And here's another US manufacturer's USB pocket external modem: Zoom Model 3095 V.92 USB Mini External Modem. The manufacturer Zoom Technologies also bills it as working with Linux. It's also cheaper than the US Robotics modem I mentioned above. I've ordered one to try with SL, as the slmodem driver is not good enough for use with my in-built softmodem.

Image
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Re: Modems

Postby Fitzcarraldo » Fri Jan 01, 2010 14:43

The Zoom model 3095 modem arrived yesterday and I have got it working. It's much better than trying to use a softmodem.

When I got it I plugged it straight into a USB port and dmesg showed the following for the modem:

Code: Select all
[  684.855109] usb 2-2: new full speed USB device using uhci_hcd and address 2
[  684.968070] usb 2-2: device descriptor read/64, error -71
[  685.181112] usb 2-2: device descriptor read/64, error -71
[  685.384068] usb 2-2: new full speed USB device using uhci_hcd and address 3
[  687.975158] usb 2-2: New USB device found, idVendor=0803, idProduct=3095
[  687.975165] usb 2-2: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=2, SerialNumber=3
[  687.975171] usb 2-2: Product: USB Modem
[  687.975175] usb 2-2: Manufacturer: Conexant
[  687.975178] usb 2-2: SerialNumber: 24680246
[  687.975438] usb 2-2: configuration #1 chosen from 2 choices
[  688.025187] cdc_acm 2-2:1.0: ttyACM0: USB ACM device
[  688.028399] usbcore: registered new interface driver cdc_acm
[  688.028623] cdc_acm: v0.26:USB Abstract Control Model driver for USB modems and ISDN adapters

The supplied Quick Start Guide and CD have plenty of information on Linux, including driver packages for several distributions (not Gentoo or Gentoo-based distributions though, unfortunately) and also a tarball. Unfortunately I just could not build the driver following the instructions in the Quick Start Guide and the driver version provided on the CD. However, I surfed over to the Linuxant driver download page (http://www.linuxant.com/drivers/dgc/downloads.php) and grabbed a copy of the latest driver tarball, dgcmodem-1.11.tar.gz, which is billed as being for arches x86, x86_64/amd64. I copied it to my Desktop and did the following as root user in a Konsole/Terminal window:

Code: Select all
# cd /home/fitzcarraldo/Desktop
# tar -xzf dgcmodem-1.11.tar.gz
# cd dgcmodem-1.11
# make install

and entered "root" and the root user's password in the pop-up window that appeared.

The driver was installed and then I entered the following command as root user to set up the modem:

Code: Select all
# /usr/bin/dgcconfig

and when I was prompted as follows:

Code: Select all
Where is the linux source build directory that matches your running kernel?
[/lib/modules/2.6.32-sabayon/build]

I entered the following, as I am using a 64-bit edition of SL and the 2.6.32 kernel:

Code: Select all
/lib64/modules/2.6.32-sabayon/build

and the script ran to completion.

Then I rebooted and did the following in a Konsole/Terminal window as root user:

Code: Select all
# cd /dev
# ls -la modem
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 7 2009-12-31 19:48 modem -> ttyACM0
# ls -la ttyACM0                           
crw-rw---- 1 root uucp 166, 0 2009-12-31 19:48 ttyACM0   
# chgrp uucp modem
# ls -la ttyACM0
crw-rw---- 1 root uucp 166, 0 2009-12-31 19:48 ttyACM0

N.B. I had added myself and the root user to the uucp group and to the dialout group some months ago. If you are not already a member of the uucp group then you need to do this:

Code: Select all
# usermod -a -G uucp fitzcarraldo
# usermod -a -G dialout fitzcarraldo

Then I rebooted, launched PuTTY as a normal user and specified 'Connection type' as Serial, 'Serial line' as /dev/modem and Speed as 9600 baud, clicked Open and clicked on the PuTTY console that opened and had to type the AT command a few times before the modem finally responded. I could tell the modem was seeing my commands because the green DATA LED was flashing on the modem when I typed "AT". All works!

For Minicom I had to setup Mincom to use the serial port /dev/modem instead of /dev/ttyS1. To do this I launched Minicom in set-up mode as the root user by using the command: mincom -s and changing the serial port set-up. After that, Mincom can be launched as a normal user and, as with PuTTY, all works.
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