Like others, I would like to ask some questions

If you are new to Linux or new to Sabayon Linux and just not sure where to post, here ya go. Post without fear of being told to RTFM :-)

Moderator: Moderators

Like others, I would like to ask some questions

Postby RedRanga » Wed Aug 04, 2010 8:57

I've been looking thru the forum for some time now, and I have to say that the help available here is streets in front of Windows. I have been thinking of changing to Linux for some time now and I would appreciate some help. How do I know which to install - 32 bit or 64 bit? (I know very little about computers, I'm using Windows 7) Will a Canon printer (mx320 all-in-one) work OK.? Can I test these things before installation? Thanks
RedRanga
Baby Hen
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Aug 01, 2010 23:51

Re: Like others, I would like to ask some questions

Postby joost » Wed Aug 04, 2010 9:31

If not sure, always download the 32bits version.
Most modern processors however support 64bits.

If it doesn't work with 64bits the CD/DVD will simply report that and refuses to boot. :D

You can always boot the DVD and use the desktop without installing a thing to your hard-disc leaving your computer 100% unmodified. This is what people refer to when they mention "Boot into Live" in these forums.

To find out if your printer is working, have a look here:
http://www.linuxfoundation.org/collabor ... abaseintro
joost
Sagely Hen
 
Posts: 2571
Joined: Fri Nov 17, 2006 12:11
Location: The Netherlands

Re: Like others, I would like to ask some questions

Postby wolfden » Wed Aug 04, 2010 9:45

RedRanga wrote: How do I know which to install - 32 bit or 64 bit?


See with this type of question, nobody can answer as you didn't provide enough information to answer it. Always try to provide as much information as you possibly can when asking or posting issues to the forum or bugzilla. This would include computer hardware which is found running commands as root, lspci and lsusb. Any log files, errors, how to reproduce so to save days of cat and mouse pulling the information from you.

If you are brand new, I suggest dual booting. Too many new people come in swearing off MS forever and wipe it out to only discover they are completely lost in linux land and go back to windows giving linux a bad name. So do yourself a favor and dual boot windows till your comfortable to completely dump it. I myself see no need to dump Windows and will always dual boot with it. There is just things I prefer to do in windows, like photo and video editing and even gaming.

Like Joost said, the 32bit is your safest one to try. Download, burn to dvd or if you have a 4gb flash drive, use unetbootin for windows to create your flash drive into a boot Operating System. The flash drive method works so much better for live distros than a dvd/cd. The performance is amazingly better. Give the Live version a test drive and decide for yourself, but please keep in mind when asking questions, give as much information as possible.
:D
wolfden
Sharecropper
 
Posts: 9050
Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2006 0:55
Location: Midwest USA

Re: Like others, I would like to ask some questions

Postby RedRanga » Thu Aug 05, 2010 17:18

I will check the site re the printers. What is the difference between 32 and 64 bit - is one better than the other? Partitioning the hard drive worries me a bit, I may get another hard drive installed. But many thanks to you both, I anticipate I will ask more questions
RedRanga
Baby Hen
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Aug 01, 2010 23:51

Re: Like others, I would like to ask some questions

Postby Fitzcarraldo » Thu Aug 05, 2010 20:07

Make sure you read the SL Wiki article about how to set up dual booting: HOWTO: Dual boot Sabayon Linux and Windows.

Partitioning a HDD can be daunting if you've never done it before. I remember studying articles about it for 2 weeks before I finally felt confident enough to do it. One older article which really helped me understand things was in the Red Hat documentation: Appendix E. An Introduction to Disk Partitions.

It is only possible to have up to four primary partitions on a HDD, so, depending on the Linux partitions you decide to create, it is possible that you will need to create an extended partition containing logical partitions. If, for example, your HDD has a hidden Windows factory restore partition and a partition for Windows itself, and you decide you want to have /boot and /home on separate partitions to the root directory, then one of many possible partitioning schemes would be:

- the hidden Windows factory restore partition (a Primary partition)
- the Windows partition (a Primary partition)
- the /boot partition (a Primary partition)
- an Extended partition containing the following Logical partitions:
- the swap partition
- the / (root) partition
- the /home partition

You'll have to decide what your partitioning scheme will be. To keep things simple, you don't really need to have a separate boot partition, so the simplest scheme for a dual booter would be:

- the hidden Windows factory restore partition (a Primary partition), assuming one already exists
- the Windows partition (a Primary partition)
- the / (root) partition (a primary partition), which will also contain the /boot and /home directories
- the swap partition (a primary partition)

But there are good arguments for having /home on a separate partition (if you re-install Linux you can avoid wiping you personal files and application configuration files that way), so another possible scheme would be:

- the hidden Windows factory restore partition (a Primary partition)
- the Windows partition (a Primary partition)
- an Extended partition containing the following Logical partitions:
- the swap partition
- the / (root) partition
- the /home partition

and so on.

The size of the swap partition is another topic that Linux users debate ad nauseam. With the large amounts of RAM these days, quite a few people argue you don't need to bother with a swap partition at all, and it is true that Linux will work without one if you have plenty of RAM (e.g. 4 Gb or more). But I think it is always good to have a swap partition, and would recommend at least 512 Mb. But, if you want to be able to suspend to RAM then you will need to make the swap partition at least as big as your RAM (e.g. on my laptop my swap partition is 4 GB as my RAM is 4 GB). Actually, if you want to suspend to RAM the swap partition can be slightly smaller than the RAM size, but that's another story: it's simpler just to make them the same if you want to be able to suspend to RAM.

Try and read as much as you can on the Web before actually doing the partitioning, and watch out for the pitfalls with shrinking Vista and Windows 7, which are explained in the SL Wiki article and the articles it links to.

Regarding the 32-bit vs. 64-bit debate, I personally think that, if you have a 64-bit processor, you should install a 64-bit OS. I have always installed 64-bit SL on my 64-bit CPUs, and the number of issues have been minimal and surmountable. 64-bit SL is a multilib installation in any case, i.e. the 64-bit edition of SL can run both 64-bit and 32-bit applications, as the Installer on the 64-bit LiveDVD installs both 32-bit and 64-bit libraries and is configured to use them accordingly. Of course, if you have a 32-bit CPU then you have no choice: you have to install a 32-bit version of Linux. Anyway, see the thread amd64, x86_64, x86, K, G, Core etc. - What do they all mean? for details of the different versions you can download.
User avatar
Fitzcarraldo
Sagely Hen
 
Posts: 7981
Joined: Sat Mar 10, 2007 5:40
Location: United Kingdom

Re: Like others, I would like to ask some questions

Postby RedRanga » Fri Aug 06, 2010 12:04

I've read all the sites that each of you has recommended, and I will read them again. I appreciate your time. I have downloaded both the 32 bit and the 64 bit, and I have bought a new hard drive. Maybe I will get into partitiioning later, but for the moment I want to have a look at the Operating System, so I'll see which one installs to the computer. I checked this forum on printers, and found a thread by Fitzcarraldo, who has replied to my questions. Could I use that software to install my printer - is there a way to adapt the whole thing? I've looked at the site suggested by Joost and couldn't find my printer there. Maybe I'm getting ahead, I'll get the OS up and running and see how I go from there. Thanks
RedRanga
Baby Hen
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Aug 01, 2010 23:51

Re: Like others, I would like to ask some questions

Postby RedRanga » Sun Aug 08, 2010 10:02

I have successfully installed the 64 bit version to a separate hard drive and it looks great! I have installed Frostwire and placed the icon on the desktop but it won't open. Even when I go to the launcher the cursor blinks for a while and then - nothing. Have I not downloaded something to go with it?
RedRanga
Baby Hen
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Aug 01, 2010 23:51

Re: Like others, I would like to ask some questions

Postby RedRanga » Mon Aug 09, 2010 10:07

I have removed Frostwire and reinstalled it, then read that a virus checker may be the trouble so I uninstalled the virus checker, and reinstalled the Frostwire, but it still doesn't open. I've only just bought this computer (used, but working well) and the seller was the one who recommended that I try this Sabayon. It works so well so far but it would be good if I could sort this Frostwire thing out. Anyone got any ideas?
RedRanga
Baby Hen
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Aug 01, 2010 23:51

Re: Like others, I would like to ask some questions

Postby joost » Mon Aug 09, 2010 13:31

Some people with equal issues seem to have resolved it here: viewtopic.php?f=59&t=19327&p=120866&hilit=frostwire#p120866
joost
Sagely Hen
 
Posts: 2571
Joined: Fri Nov 17, 2006 12:11
Location: The Netherlands


Return to Beginners|Newbies Area

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron