Sabayon Questions

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Sabayon Questions

Postby ThisGUY » Tue Jun 25, 2013 17:57

Hello Sabayon community. I am happly running the OS of my choice but I am a little currious on how this distro works. It says it is based off of Geento that means I have to compile all my sofware right or is there binary packages too. Also how stable is this Os and how frequently are updates given out and what are the size of the updates. Also what kernel do you guys have I saw it said something about 3.9kernel will be given with in hours what ever that means.

Also do you guys get any packages from Arch because on your homescreen there is a termnial open looking like it is downloading something from Arch repos
Cheers :D
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Re: Sabayon Questions

Postby dabbill » Tue Jun 25, 2013 18:24

Sabayon is a binary package version of Gentoo, but you can still compile stuff form source with emerge just the same as Gentoo.
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Re: Sabayon Questions

Postby Stupot » Tue Jun 25, 2013 18:49

Sabayon offers binary packages as the default. Those binary packages are built from gentoo packages, thus maintaining compatibility with gentoo. Most sabayon users don't compile anything from source themselves.

We do have the 3.9 kernel available for install. To see a list of available kernels, check out: http://packages.sabayon.org/quicksearch ... on&x=0&y=0

You can use that site to search for any other sabayon packages you might curious about.

Like Arch, Sabayon is a rolling distro. We update fairly frequently. Large updates will come when your DE's have updates. We don't get any packages from Arch, we just have a decent amount in common.

Sabayon is fairly bleeding edge. It's definitely not the most stable distro out there, but it is very stable concerning how bleeding edge the packages are. There are different repositories you can use to mitigate the risk of issues for this exact reason. Sabayon-weekly is only updated once a week and any little kinks in the system are usually worked out before hitting these repos.
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Re: Sabayon Questions

Postby ThisGUY » Wed Jun 26, 2013 3:12

So does Geento even support Binary packages is there any way to get them in pure Geento?

So this Os is not very stable?
and updates are every week?

Might give a quick spin but ISOs are kind of well...Big....
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Re: Sabayon Questions

Postby Fitzcarraldo » Wed Jun 26, 2013 14:09

ThisGUY wrote:So does Geento even support Binary packages is there any way to get them in pure Geento?

It's 'Gentoo', not 'Geento'. Yes, 'pure' Gentoo does support binary packages, although Gentoo users generally don't bother with them because the whole point of a source-based distribution is that you compile the package on your machine so that it is optimised for your specific machine. You'll find a few binary packages in the Gentoo repositories, though, such as www-client/firefox-bin and app-office/libreoffice-bin as those take a long time to build on older machines. Even on my Core i7 laptop app-office/libreoffice can take around 1.5 hours to build, so some Gentoo users prefer to install app-office/libreoffice-bin instead. SL, on the other hand, is a binary distribution, so, by definition, all the packages are pre-compiled. In Gentoo, app-office/libreoffice is a source package; in SL app-office/libreoffice is a binary package (which is why the package app-office/libreoffice-bin would be pointless in SL and is therefore not available in the SL repositories).

ThisGUY wrote:So this Os is not very stable?
and updates are every week?

Define 'stable'. I find SL stable on the machines I'm running it on. I'm using the main repositories (the different types are defined in the Package Repositories section in the SL Wiki article Entropy) and am sticking with OpenRC rather than systemd (SL gives you the choice of using either init system), and find it very stable. SL is based on the Testing (a.k.a. Unstable) Branch of Gentoo, so, by definition, it will be less stable than the Stable Branch of Gentoo. The SL developers label SL as a 'bleeding-edge distribution' but, actually, it is less bleeding-edge in some areas and more so in others. It's actually quite conservative in some areas, which is why you'll see some posts requesting package bumps in these forums.

ThisGUY wrote:Might give a quick spin but ISOs are kind of well...Big....

I recommend the Xfce edition of SL. See my blog (link in my signature) for a few posts with tips on using Xfce in SL. I find Xfce very usable these days, without the bloat of KDE and GNOME but with all the applications I want on my home machines.
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Re: Sabayon Questions

Postby ThisGUY » Thu Jun 27, 2013 2:40

Hi Fitzcarraldo and thanks for responding on my "Gentoo" questions :wink:

You say there are some Binary packages that can be found in Gentoo I am guessing you can also Compile them to if you wanted to,right? For example if I were to want to install another Desktop environment like KDE I am hoping I can find that as a binary as compiling that can take a LONG while. Also if I wanted to Compile something in Sabayon how would I do it?

Also you guys seem to have Binary packages in your Sabayon repos is there a way to compile software pointed toward Sabayons repos or would I have to point it toward Gentoos? Also do you have any compile packages in Sabayon

Define 'stable'


Well lets see. Updates or packages that are not tested or the update or packages is made and is distributed after a short time after it is made therefore is not tested as well as it should be and is pushed to the repos so the user can install them is not really my definition of stable OS as it can break easy ( by the way does Gentoo test its testing branch updates and packages before sending them to the repos?)and of course stable as in the user experience with the Os... Does it lag,crash open application when it wants to etc. but that's just my definition of Stable everybody eleses is probable alittle different. But I am guessing the Sabayon team tests there updates and packages testing or stable before pushing them to the user(Testing just gets pushed out sooner than Stable therefore testing gets more up to date things). it is the user responsibility to research the update before installing them. So all updates you get are Testing unless I tell it to point it toward the Stable branch how ever way you do that in Gentoo. When an Os says it is bleeding edge than stablity is usually out of the question unless the bleeding edge packages are tested well! I do not know if you do this in your Distro but in the one I am using before I update I can go through the update manger and it will tell me if the update is from unstable repositories or stable repositories because i guess it has some backports to the unstable branch but it is based on Stable so I get mostly stable updates. Does this Os or Gentoo support backports?

I recommend the Xfce edition of SL. See my blog (link in my signature) for a few posts with tips on using Xfce in SL. I find Xfce very usable these days, without the bloat of KDE and GNOME but with all the applications I want on my home machines.


Thanks! I am so surprised at how good Xfec can look and how low resources it uses,too! I do kind of like KDE it does come with a lot of applications but it is so flexible and customization it is ridiculous and some KDE application are not half bad like Ktorrent is is very speedy and gets the job done and so does KGet. I never really used Gnome,though. Although Chromium Brower has become the biggest Ram hog I have ever seen! It is good at not memory leaking but a typical usage of Firefox is like 825MB a typical usage of Chromium is 2.1GB! Firefox does use a decent bit of CPU though.

I am currently using a Debian based 64 bit Os and it is quite nice! But am am interested in how Gentoo works!

By the way what do you mean by "init system" the first thing that starts up in boot???

I am really stuck between Sabayon and Calculate Linux. I do not know if you have ever heard of Calculate Linux but they are Gentoo based and are quite interesting as well as this Os. If you have never tried them you might want too! :cyclops:

Also do you guy use APT?
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Re: Sabayon Questions

Postby Stupot » Thu Jun 27, 2013 4:23

A binary package is already compiled. You don't compile a binary package.

For Sabayon, you should pick entropy (Sabayon's binary package management) or portage (Gentoo's source package management). It's not recommended to mix and match, because binary packages have much stricter dependencies. That said, it is possible to install a gentoo source package just fine in Sabayon, but that's really for more advanced users. Most users don't ever need this option.

Most Sabayon users think it's pretty stable, or else they wouldn't be using it. But everybody has different limits of what is acceptable to them. You are correct that you get to pick the repo to use which determines how well tested your packages are before they get to you.

Sabayon's packages tend to be much newer than Debians. Backports are needed when you are running older versions of something and a later version has a bug fixed. With Sabayon, you'll pretty much always be running that "later version". We do patch and recompile things in different ways to get around issues though.

Init systems are what starts up all of the applications upon booting. When you boot, first the linux kernel loads. Then it starts up the init system and the init system starts up everything else. There are a few different init systems to choose from, with systemD being the latest one that a lot of distros seem to be switching too. It starts up a lot faster than other init systems, but is newer and changing rapidly. Sabayon also supports an older and more proven init system, OpenRC at the moment.

I've heard of Calculate Linux, but I haven't used it personally.

And no, we don't use APT, we use Entropy. https://wiki.sabayon.org/index.php?title=En:Entropy
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Re: Sabayon Questions

Postby MALsPa » Thu Jun 27, 2013 11:16

I'm probably newer to Sabayon than most of the members of this community, but I've been pleasantly surprised by this distro, with regards to quality as well as stability.

I like to see how things go with a distro after having it installed for at least a year; after a couple of years, if possible. My current Sabayon installation dates from a year ago yesterday (note my "Joined" date at these forums). That was Sabayon 9, with KDE 4.8.3. I've simply followed the instructions from the wiki and from these forums, and brought in updates once a week (usually), and here I am now, Sabayon 13.04 with KDE 4.10.4.

Much better than I ever expected from a cutting-edge, rolling-release distro. I also run a handful of other distros (I've got Debian Stable installed here, for example); in my opinion, no distro is perfect, there are always pros and cons. But Sabayon measures up very nicely to any of 'em. Just my two cents worth.
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Re: Sabayon Questions

Postby dunsurfin » Thu Jun 27, 2013 12:47

ThisGUY wrote: Also if I wanted to Compile something in Sabayon how would I do it?

Also you guys seem to have Binary packages in your Sabayon repos is there a way to compile software pointed toward Sabayons repos or would I have to point it toward Gentoos? Also do you have any compile packages in Sabayon


Sabayon has it's own overlay of specific packages for compiling otherwise the Gentoo packages are used. The commands for building packages are the standard portage commands of Gentoo and it is recommended to keep portage up to date just in case you need it.
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Re: Sabayon Questions

Postby ThisGUY » Thu Jun 27, 2013 17:32

This really cool. so basically with Sabayon you kind of get the best of both worlds! You have a choice to compile your software or you have a choice to get binary software,too? That quite awesome if you ask me! As for stability I guess i will not know in till giving it a try on a separate partition! That is pretty cool you guys have the latest KDE! I mean I have it too on Debian Stable but because of backports of course!
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