Sabayon 5.0 + Windows 7 DualBoot

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Re: Sabayon 5.0 + Windows 7 DualBoot

Postby Fitzcarraldo » Sun Dec 06, 2009 13:49

I would broadly agree with what Marius wrote, with a few comments:

a) If I had the disk space on my own laptop then, given the Linux partition structure I use (boot, root, home, swap), I would like to have around 50 to 60 Gb for the root partition. That way I would not have to even think about the size of /usr/portage/distfiles/ and could reinstall whatever I wanted without being connected to the Internet.
b) If you do create another partition that can be read by both Windows and Linux, I would suggest NTFS rather than FAT32 due to the maximum file size of circa 4 Gb imposed by FAT32, which I have found to be a restriction if downloading large ISOs, videos, etc.
c) I haven't used Ext2Fsd myself so I'm not sure how well it works, if at all, with the default SL file system, which is now ext4 (although more-experienced users can of course decide to use other file systems if they want). In any case, be very careful allowing Windows to have Write access to your Linux partitions. Actually I would advise against it. A malware cleaning tool running in Windows once corrupted my Linux root partition (see A cautionary tale for dual booters of SL and Windows). In my opinion a 'shared' NTFS or FAT32 partition (or external NTFS USB HDD if the internal HDD size is limited, which is not the OP's case) would be preferable to allowing Windows to have Write access to Linux partitions.
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Re: Sabayon 5.0 + Windows 7 DualBoot

Postby Fitzcarraldo » Sun Dec 06, 2009 15:35

Target_Acquired wrote:When the screen in the Sabayon installation in which I am prompted to select the partition I would like to install on,
What would I select?
Would I select all three?
Or just /?
But then, how would /home be used as /'s /home ... and how would I apply SWAP to the whole bundle?
And, will switching between OS's from time to time harm my computer after a while?

Technically, Can you explain how I would install Sabayon on these three, newly created partitions?

I feel like an asshole having just bombarding you with question after question.
Please understand That I am a novice when it comes to things like this.
I am sincerely thankful for the time you are spending on me, helping out a n00b.

:oops: :oops: :oops:

Firstly, you don't have to be embarrassed about all the questions. Doing what you are doing for the very first time can be a daunting prospect.

If you have created the partitions before booting the SL LiveDVD then the process is relatively straightforward. When you launch the Installer, don't forget to click on the Update Installer button before doing anything else: this will ensure you have the latest version of the Installer. You of course need to be connected to the Internet for this.

You can see a (slightly out-of-date) visual tour of the installation process in the SL wiki: Visual Tour: Installing Sabayon Linux KDE4. You will get to a window that lets you specify whether you want SL to create the partitions ('automatically partition') or whether you want to use partitions you have created already ('manually partition'). On all but one of my PCs I opted for the latter. You will then be taken to another window where you can specify if you want to actually create each partition -- which I don't do as I have already created them before running the Installer -- or if you just want to format each of them and assign each of them to be /, /boot, /home, swap or whatever, and what file system you want to use. For the latter, stick with ext4. This is a safe (and good) choice for a newcomer (or anyone else, for that matter). With the Installer GUI, it should be obvious to you what to do. Just take your time and read everything displayed before making a decision. The GUI for this particular part of the operation does make things easy to understand if you know what a partition is and what a file system is in the first place. You just select and assign each partition, one by one, using the same GUI window in the Installer. It's all 'point-and-click' type actions.

At this point I should ask you if you know what an Extended Partition is, though, because there is a limit to the number of primary partitions one can create (it's four). To get around this restriction there are 'Extended Partitions' which can contain 'logical partitions'. For example, I have the following partitions on my 160 Gb HDD:

/dev/sda1 is my hidden Windows factory partition for re-installing Windows using the Restore DVD supplied by the manufacturer of my PC.
/dev/sda2 is my Windows C: Drive partition.
/dev/sda3 is my Linux /boot partition.
/dev/sda4 is an Extended partition, containing the following three logical partitions:
/dev/sda5 is my /root partition.
/dev/sda6 is my /home partition.
/dev/sda7 is my swap partition.

So I have the maximum number allowed of primary partitions (/dev/sda1, /dev/sda2, /dev/sda3 and /dev/sda4) but I am able to have seven partitions because I made one of the primary partitions into an Extended Partition containing three logical partitions.

If you are confused about the above, read the Red Hat guide An Introduction to disk Partitions. It's a rather old guide, so treat what it says with a little caution, but the basic explanations are excellent.

By the way, on another subject, the point regarding hidden Windows Factory Restore partitions, made by Marius is important. If indeed your PC manufacturer supplied your PC with one of these hidden Factory Restore partitions then, when you get to one of the SL Installer's windows during the installation process you can select where you want the GRUB boot loader to be installed (the options are: in the MBR or in /boot). I normally select the latter. Then only a small addition is made in the MBR which causes your PC to jump to the GRUB boot loader in /boot and display the OS selection menu from there. If I recall correctly, to get to the page to select this option you have to tick 'Configure advanced boot loader options'. See the old Red Hat 9 documentation page 3.20. Boot Loader Configuration to give you a rough idea of what I'm talking about. I'm sure Google would throw up something more up-to-date, but you should be able to understand what we're talking about after looking at that.
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Re: Sabayon 5.0 + Windows 7 DualBoot

Postby Target_Acquired » Mon Dec 07, 2009 18:29

Fitzcarraldo wrote:
Target_Acquired wrote:When the screen in the Sabayon installation in which I am prompted to select the partition I would like to install on,
What would I select?
Would I select all three?
Or just /?
But then, how would /home be used as /'s /home ... and how would I apply SWAP to the whole bundle?
And, will switching between OS's from time to time harm my computer after a while?

Technically, Can you explain how I would install Sabayon on these three, newly created partitions?

I feel like an asshole having just bombarding you with question after question.
Please understand That I am a novice when it comes to things like this.
I am sincerely thankful for the time you are spending on me, helping out a n00b.

:oops: :oops: :oops:

Firstly, you don't have to be embarrassed about all the questions. Doing what you are doing for the very first time can be a daunting prospect.

If you have created the partitions before booting the SL LiveDVD then the process is relatively straightforward. When you launch the Installer, don't forget to click on the Update Installer button before doing anything else: this will ensure you have the latest version of the Installer. You of course need to be connected to the Internet for this.

You can see a (slightly out-of-date) visual tour of the installation process in the SL wiki: Visual Tour: Installing Sabayon Linux KDE4. You will get to a window that lets you specify whether you want SL to create the partitions ('automatically partition') or whether you want to use partitions you have created already ('manually partition'). On all but one of my PCs I opted for the latter. You will then be taken to another window where you can specify if you want to actually create each partition -- which I don't do as I have already created them before running the Installer -- or if you just want to format each of them and assign each of them to be /, /boot, /home, swap or whatever, and what file system you want to use. For the latter, stick with ext4. This is a safe (and good) choice for a newcomer (or anyone else, for that matter). With the Installer GUI, it should be obvious to you what to do. Just take your time and read everything displayed before making a decision. The GUI for this particular part of the operation does make things easy to understand if you know what a partition is and what a file system is in the first place. You just select and assign each partition, one by one, using the same GUI window in the Installer. It's all 'point-and-click' type actions.


At this point I should ask you if you know what an Extended Partition is, though, because there is a limit to the number of primary partitions one can create (it's four). To get around this restriction there are 'Extended Partitions' which can contain 'logical partitions'. For example, I have the following partitions on my 160 Gb HDD:

/dev/sda1 is my hidden Windows factory partition for re-installing Windows using the Restore DVD supplied by the manufacturer of my PC.
/dev/sda2 is my Windows C: Drive partition.
/dev/sda3 is my Linux /boot partition.
/dev/sda4 is an Extended partition, containing the following three logical partitions:
/dev/sda5 is my /root partition.
/dev/sda6 is my /home partition.
/dev/sda7 is my swap partition.

So I have the maximum number allowed of primary partitions (/dev/sda1, /dev/sda2, /dev/sda3 and /dev/sda4) but I am able to have seven partitions because I made one of the primary partitions into an Extended Partition containing three logical partitions.

If you are confused about the above, read the Red Hat guide An Introduction to disk Partitions. It's a rather old guide, so treat what it says with a little caution, but the basic explanations are excellent.

By the way, on another subject, the point regarding hidden Windows Factory Restore partitions, made by Marius is important. If indeed your PC manufacturer supplied your PC with one of these hidden Factory Restore partitions then, when you get to one of the SL Installer's windows during the installation process you can select where you want the GRUB boot loader to be installed (the options are: in the MBR or in /boot). I normally select the latter. Then only a small addition is made in the MBR which causes your PC to jump to the GRUB boot loader in /boot and display the OS selection menu from there. If I recall correctly, to get to the page to select this option you have to tick 'Configure advanced boot loader options'. See the old Red Hat 9 documentation page 3.20. Boot Loader Configuration to give you a rough idea of what I'm talking about. I'm sure Google would throw up something more up-to-date, but you should be able to understand what we're talking about after looking at that.


So the installer will help me configure the partitions.
I see!

Thank you Fitzcarraldo!
:D
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