Linux keeps man from receiving warranty repairs

If you want to talk about your personal paperweight, you've found the right place!

Moderator: Moderators

xlnagla
Sagely Hen
Posts: 1078
Joined: Mon May 28, 2007 2:44

Re: Sabayon Voids Warranties

Post by xlnagla » Tue May 13, 2008 0:34

dell told me the same thing, and that was back when I was using a vista beta (still hoping that something worthwhile had come from M$) and had to replace a power chord. I used the standardized parts trick - find a friend with a warranty, same laptop but with XP, and switched out the broken power chord for his. He got my chord replaced and we've both been happy. This has worked pretty much every time so far, but it's kinda a hassle - when I get a new computer I'm keeping a 2GB partition with M$ on it and just editing grub to convince whatever technician works on my computer I'm not a linux man.

~xlnagla

wolfden
Sharecropper
Posts: 9051
Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2006 0:55
Location: Midwest USA
Contact:

Re: Sabayon Voids Warranties

Post by wolfden » Tue May 13, 2008 5:03

holy old news :shock:

I think there is even a topic on this already if I was to really look

wolfden
Sharecropper
Posts: 9051
Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2006 0:55
Location: Midwest USA
Contact:

Re: Linux keeps man from receiving warranty repairs

Post by wolfden » Tue May 13, 2008 5:06

Ja I knew its

Merged topics

:wink:

chickpea
Sagely Hen
Posts: 1084
Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2007 15:08
Location: Washington, DC

Re: Linux keeps man from receiving warranty repairs

Post by chickpea » Tue May 13, 2008 16:25

dunsurfin wrote:under the "sale of goods, implied terms" act in the UK, he will be able to argue that the laptop is not fit for the purpose for which it was purchased.
Not a UK atty, but a US atty, but more than likely this would fall under the "implied warranty of merchantability", not "fit for a particular purpose". (Provided that this UK act is close in many was to the UNCITRAL uniform commerical codes). Merchantability means generally without manufacturing defects and would "pass without objection in the trade". "Fit for a particular purpose" would mean that it is not usable in a particular function for which it was intended. For the laptop to function at all, the screen needs to work. If this were say a touchscreen that was malfunctioning as a touchscreen (but otherwise functional) that would more than likely breach the warranty of fit for a particular purpose. The difference really only matters to lawyers. :P

/legal mumbo jumbo

Post Reply